Reviews

The Sentinel (Book Review)

It’s always exciting to hear about a new Jack Reacher book from Lee Child. I enjoy the way these stories unfold, they are fast-paced action adventures that always leave one wanting more. The Sentinel is no different, and if you’re a fan of this series you will no doubt enjoy this next journey together with this now famous character.

Reacher’s next stop is in a sleepy town outside Nashville, Tennessee. But his plan to move along quickly changes after he saves a man from a kidnapping attempt. Rusty Rutherford is an IT guy, but clearly someone believes he knows more than he thinks he does after the town is shut down by a cyber attack. There has been a ransomware attack, a malicious program has locked up the computer network bringing the town to a standstill.

Before long it becomes clear that there is more to this attack. Even though this isn’t Reacher’s problem he doesn’t choose to walk away, instead as the bag guys move in on Rutherfood he stays to help. As we know Reacher has a specific set of skills, he likes information and his awareness of his surroundings, and the fact that he’s instinctively hardwired to detect danger, make him a formidable foe. He’s an intimidating man, not only is he tall and broad but he has a “web of scars around the knuckles of his enormous hands” that tell you he’s adept at making others see things from a different angle. In short he’s the kind of guy you want on your team if you’re ever in trouble.

Fans will know that this latest Jack Reacher was written by Lee Child in collaboration with his younger brother Andrew. The authors use this to modernize Reacher somewhat, something which you will either love or hate. Personally I’m looking forward to seeing how this fresh perspective will shape the future of Reacher, who the two brothers admit is a kind of family property.

The Sentinel is available from bookstores and online retailers for a recommended retail price of R330.

Thanks to Penguin Random House for sharing this book with me.

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